IBIS MOJO HD4

INTRODUCING THE 4TH GENERATION MOJO HD

Suspension technology, drivetrain performance, materials technology, carbon frame construction techniques and especially wheel and tire technology have all enjoyed tremendous technological advances in the last few years. All of us who ride have benefitted greatly. All the technologies found in the HD4 are built to currently accepted state-of-the-art standards. 

One of the design goals of the HD4 was to enhance the bike's handling capabilities over rough and steep terrain. The Mojo HD and Mojo 3 have had a lot of overlap and geometry similarities, with the new HD4 we are interested in separating the two bikes and growing the HD4's capabilities. We have been riding geometry testing mules for almost a year now, sampling different angles and lengths to determine the right feel for this bike. We've test ridden extensively in Santa Cruz, Downieville, Northstar, and in the high Sierras to get a feel for different terrains and traction conditions and the particular needs of each. 

In dialing in the geometry, we gave ourselves free reign to figure out what would work best. Instead of choosing a geometry by committee or based on other companies' bikes, we chose our geometry based on what worked best when we rode the steepest and gnarliest trails we could find. In our testing, we were able to see what each geometry dimension actually did to help the rider. For example, by trying a number of head angles back to back to back, with all other geometry dimensions held constant, we were able to pinpoint some desirable characteristics. The obvious one is that with proper trail measurement, the bike’s ability to steamroll through rough terrain is greatly enhanced. Less intuitive, but borne out by testing is that reducing the head angle will allow the bike to achieve higher lean angles before slipping out. This change also makes the bike more stable as the trail transitions to off-camber, meaning it’s less likely to slip out or get pushed down by the trail. On the Mojo HD4 we set the head angle at 64.9 degrees to maximize the stability in off-camber sections, increase our maximum lean angle and allow us to carry great speed through the chunder.