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IBIS RIPLEY 29 & RIPLEY LS

For many of us working at Ibis, the Ripley has been our favorite bike since the day it came out. And indeed, if you look at the reviews you’ll see that we weren't alone. Still, riding styles and components are constantly evolving so we updated it to add to its already amazing versatility. 

The Ripley development story has reached almost mythic status and it seems every review of the bike adds another year to the development.  Yes, it took 6 years, but in that time we went through two wheel sizes, two travel lengths, two types of bearings, and two factories.  It was a long road but also a rewarding result.  

Originally we approached Dave Weagle (suspension guru, inventor of the dw-link who has never let us down on a suspension design) and told him we wanted to build a super fast and lightweight suspension bike and that it needed to be efficient for racing but not so focused on it that it wasn’t good at anything else. We asked for 100mm of travel and told him we wanted to be able to build the bike to be the lightest and stiffest in class. What he came back with surprised us: He had figured out how to shrink the whole dw-link system down to two tiny eccentric links.

During the same time we were riding other 29ers and realized how we were spoiled by the 140mm of front and rear travel found on the Mojo. The big wheels certainly help mitigate the shorter travel, but 100mm forks to us felt like we were going back in time (not in a good way). We're were sure a 100mm bike would make a World Cup fire road racer happy but it wouldn't make us happy. Back to Dave. Can you make the eccentric bike have 120mm of travel and still be just as efficient? No problem he said, so we both got to work.

NEW! LONGER AND SLACKER GEOMETRY OPTION

The Ripley is now available in two geometry configurations. The Ripley LS features a 15mm longer top tube and is available in Medium, Large and XL sizes, and the LS also features a slack 67.5 degree head angle. This allows for shorter stems and adds stability at speed. The second geometry iteration is identical to the original Ripley. So the original nimble handling geometry that redefined how a 29er could corner is still available (in medium and large sizes).